Person of the Year Award Function
Vol 7 Issue 17, Apr 22 - 28, 2016
    Citizen Reporters      |   | Submit Story
Green WarriorsSocial EntrepreneursUnsung Heroes

Love for national bird puts an obscure Bihar village on the national map

   By  Imran Khan
   Madhopur (Bihar)
01 May 2016
Posted 18-May-2012
Vol 3 Issue 20

A wave of excitement has swept Bihar's Madhopur-Gobind village, home to around 500 peacocks. For years, people here have proudly co-existed with the national bird, and now the state government is contemplating developing it as 'mayur vihar', a protected site for the bird.

The village situated in East Champaran district is popularly known as 'mor gaon' or peacock village, and is divided into two parts by the Gandak canal.

The peacocks in the village have become friendly with the humans and they co-exist peacefully

Villagers' hopes were raised last month when Chief Minister Nitish Kumar visited the village, spread over 700 acres. He directed the authorities to take steps to protect peacocks and facilitate their safe breeding. Peacocks are also known as 'mayur' in Hindi.

Anil Kumar Singh and his neighbour Santosh Singh are among hundreds of villagers who are expecting a team of wildlife experts to visit the village soon.

"A team of wildlife experts is likely to visit our village to study the steps to be taken to provide safety to peacocks," Anil said.

Lalbabu Manjhi, a district forest official, said over a dozen peacocks can be spotted in any part of the village which is a rare thing.

"The state government is contemplating developing the village as 'mayur vihar' to attract tourists and protect the national bird," he said.

He said tourists will be delighted to see peacocks walking and sitting near them. "Peacocks are treating the village as their home. They are perching freely on tree tops, huts and rooftops. Sometimes they hide in dense bamboo groves and mango orchards."

Anil said the village has become a natural habitat for peacocks. "Villagers are ready to provide land to the government to develop part of the canal land as a peacock habitat."

"In a bid to conserve and protect peacocks, villagers have an old system to punish or fine anyone found guilty of killing them," he revealed.

Santosh said peacocks are a source of happiness and peace for children and women, particularly during the rainy season. "Dancing peacocks and upbeat peacocks are a delight for all of us as they give us energy," he said.

The bird was first brought to the village over 60 years ago when one Chandrika Singh bought a couple of peacocks from the Sonepur fair in 1950, according to another villager, Pramod Kumar.

"The number of the birds has swelled over the years. Since there are restrictions against the domestication of the birds, the villagers have jointly provided a number of shelters for them near the village orchard, cowsheds and outhouses," he said.

The villagers have also taken the responsibility of protecting the birds from animals or poachers. A pond has been made especially for the use of the birds. Most of the birds have become friendly with the humans and they co-exist peacefully. - IANS
 



Print  |  Email  | 
 Share   

You might also like:

Breach of contract

It has now come to light that the Russian made reactor pressure vessel fitted at the Kudankulam nuclear plant is an obsolete, unsafe model with welds in the core region, says Sam Rajappa

Read More

Captor of moments

Forced to work in a studio at the age of nine, Prakash Tilokani picked the nuances of the art to emerge as a leading wedding photographer having top business families and Bollywood celebs as clients. Kavita Kanan Chandra chronicles his life

Read More

Stories on Innovations & Innovators
The Lead Star Digital Issue
adyar bakery
 
Mentoring Tamil Nadu



Popular Stories

Family lunch

When there is an eatery at every nook and cranny, why do people travel as far as 200 km for lunch in an obscure village near Erode? Usha Prasad brings the flavour of UBM Namma Veetu Saapaadu, served in a plantain leaf for the whole family

Read More

Grit gets success

From selling samosas on Chennai streets to setting up his own pakora shop to owning a Rs 1.5 crore company supplying delicacies to five star hotels, J Haja Funyamin has come a long way. P C Vinoj Kumar captures the flavour of a success story

Read More

Watershed innovation

Bhungroo in Gujarati means a hollow pipe. But Biplab Ketan Paul gave the word a new meaning by an innovation that has led to water availability, soil improvement and women empowerment, thus helping 14,000 farmers, says Kavita Kanan Chandra

Read More

Momo monarchs

Two friends in Kolkata, keen on turning their culinary delight into business, rejected job offers in a campus interview to start a momo kiosk. Eight years on, their venture started with Rs.30,000 has grown into a Rs.100 Cr entity, says G Singh

Read More

Model farmer

In a region known for farmer suicides and parched fields, Gudivada Nagaratnam Naidu returned to his roots, giving up a job, and went on to create a farm revolution. S Sainath visited Naidu’s farm near Hyderabad that’s even got an apple tree

Read More

Quality of success

Aasife Biriyani, popular among Chennai’s foodies and sold through nine outlets, was dispensed from a pushcart 18 years ago. Founder Aasife Ahmed made it a Rs 70 crore turnover chain by just not compromising on quality, says P C Vinoj Kumar

Read More

A free lunch

An ordinary simple middle class couple has been serving free lunch to 34 senior citizens in Mumbai since 2012. Somma Banerjjee finds out why Yvonne and Mark D’Souza are so selfless in service

Read More

Doctor Poor

A doctor extraordinaire, 33-year-old Sunilkumar Hebbi treats patients for free and has conducted over 650 medical camps in and around Bengaluru, benefitting 30,000 poor people. Usha Prasad tells us how a beggar inspired him to serve the poor

Read More

Caring the carer

People caring for patients in government hospitals often stay hungry. But a Good Samaritan acknowledges their service and takes care of them too by providing them food, says P C Vinoj Kumar

Read More

Water saver

The innovation by Uttam Banerjee is a godsend to the country that needs to go in for water conservation in a big way. Fitting Zerodor, a polymeric wall, to ceramic urinals would save 50,000 to 1,51,000 litres of water, says Narendra Kaushik

Read More
 
Kudos image

"The Weekend Leader not only gives a glimpse of the better things happening around us but also tells stories of people who made it possible.”

Ajay Chaturvedi, Entrepreneur More Kudos
 
Archives  |   Columns  |   About Us  |   Contact Us  |   Feedback  |   Response  |     |   Cheers!  |   Support Us  |   Friends of Positive Journalism
© Copyright The Weekend Leader.com, 2010. All rights reserved.