Person of the Year 2015
Vol 6 Issue 9, Feb 27 - Mar 5, 2015
    Citizen Reporters      |   | Submit Story
Green WarriorsSocial EntrepreneursUnsung Heroes

The biggest question: Do animals have a language?

05-Mar-2015
London

Posted 01 Feb 2013

The most puzzling natural mystery people want solved is whether animals have their own language, according to a poll.

Asked to choose from 10 unanswered questions about the natural world, a third (31 percent) of British people said whether animals use language was one of the issues they most wanted answered, the Daily Mail reported.

The second most burning question was how the dinosaurs died out, with 29 percent of the 2,000 people polled putting that query.

More than a fifth (22 percent) wanted to know why cats purr.

The poll was for the launch of new TV show by David Attenborough, "Natural Curiosities", on a British channel.

It also revealed some of the most commonly believed myths about nature.

Almost half those polled (47 percent) believed female Praying Mantis eat the males after sex, although research has found that only happened once in 69 experiments.

Another 37 percent thought camels store water in their humps, rather than storing fat to provide energy. - IANS
 



Print  |  Email  | 
 Share   


You might also like:

Unsung champions

India's visually impaired cricketers have won the ODI World Cup for the first time, but nobody cares for them. The national team travels in unreserved railway coaches. Abhishek Purohit reports

Read More

Face of hope

Her face on wall posters has inspired HIV positive people in Odisha not to give up hope. Rakhi Ghosh tracks the life and times of Prabhasini Pradhan, who founded a network for those with HIV

Read More
Stories on Innovations & Innovators
THE LEAD STAR
adyar bakery
 
Mentoring Tamil Nadu



Popular Stories

Educator extraordinaire

When Rajesh Kumar Sharma went to see how Metro Rail work was progressing near the Yamuna station, he realized that poor children had no school to attend. So he set up ‘Under the Bridge School’. Partho Burman meets the educator extraordinaire

Read More

Green cobblers

Inspired by a man making sandals out of used tyres in the US, Jay Rege and Jothsna came to India to turn eco-conscious shoemakers, launching ‘Paaduks’. The social entrepreneurs also share their profit with their cobblers, says Rohan Potdar

Read More

Sandy wonders

If the word Goa evokes just images of raves, read on, you may end up in the land of sandy wonders soon. For, Renuka Singh’s list of the top 10 beaches informs us that Goa has something on offer for everyone, including those seeking solitude

Read More

Saving girls

Her first attempt to save a 12-year-old girl from the clutches of an abusive father failed. But that propelled Renu Singh to turn a crusader for gender justice and rescue about 3,800 girls and women in over three decades, says Partho Burman

Read More

Milky boom

The success of Milky Mist, a dairy company, is a story linked to the big dreams of T Sathish Kumar, a class 8 drop out. P C Vinoj Kumar tells us how a 16-year-old turned his father’s floundering business around by giving it a new identity

Read More

Missing Nobel

Winner of many awards for his social work in Mumbai slums, Jockin Arputham missed the Nobel Peace in 2014. But for people whose life he changed through his dedication, he is indeed an ‘arputham’ (miracle, in Tamil), says Kavita Kanan Chandra

Read More

Saviour on street

Whatever job he was in, S M Venkatesh saved abandoned people from the streets. Now, his Agal Foundation works with Helpage India, responding to distress calls, quickly and efficiently, as P C Vinoj Kumar found through a snap sting operation

Read More

Saving children

Starting with a night shelter for children of sex workers, Prerana has come a long way providing support to women stuck in Mumbai’s red light district. Kavita Kanan Chandra retraces Priti Patkar’s 28-year journey that has saved many a child

Read More

Good ball

To counter ‘guns and drugs’, a culture that he saw abroad, Chetan Misra mentors children through football, which he believes is a tool for social and holistic development. Through ‘TheFootballLink’, he promotes the game, says Partho Burman

Read More

Bringing water

By reviving a traditional irrigation system, using modern techniques, an NGO, Gramya Vikash Manch, has channeled water to three parched districts of Assam, raising hopes of a bumper harvest

Read More
 
Kudos image

"The Weekend Leader not only gives a glimpse of the better things happening around us but also tells stories of people who made it possible.”

Ajay Chaturvedi, Entrepreneur More Kudos
 
Archives  |   Columns  |   About Us  |   Contact Us  |   Feedback  |   Response  |     |   Cheers!  |   Support Us  |   Friends of Positive Journalism
© Copyright The Weekend Leader.com, 2010. All rights reserved.